Stage Fright [EXPLORE]

There are few fears that strike such terror into the hearts of people everywhere as clowns and public speaking.  “Secrets of Dynamic Communication” by Ken Davis will help with the latter; you’re on your own with the clowns.

Ever since my college graduation, I have been involved in vocations that have placed a large emphasis on public speaking.  My roles in politics and in the ministry have both nudged me into the spotlight on several occasions.  Let me tell you this, I wish that I had a book like this years ago!

Davis offers up his highly acclaimed SCORRE Conference in book form to readers, providing the step by step process of how to become a better speaker.  His process breaks down like this,

Subject—Select a broad topic like faith, marketing, or scuba diving

Central Theme—Narrow it down to a single aspect of the subject, like the dangers of scuba diving or pitfalls of marketing

Objective—Craft a concise sentence that forces you to remain on topic like “Every person can learn to scuba dive by following these steps.

Rationale—These brief points will become the content of the message

Resources—Use powerful on-point illustrations, stories, and jokes.

Evaluate—Critique yourself both before and after speech in order to become a better speaker.

This book is effective because of Davis’ constant call to keep things concise and to the point.  The call for on topic speeches spills over into practical steps such as the need to cut out a humorous yet irrelevant story.  The call to trim the fat off the talk and become focused on the objective statement is also very powerful.  We all can recall the unbearable rambling talk that hit ten unrelated points and can remember how painful this unfocused speech was to sit through (I remember several of my own speeches in that category!).  Davis will help you stay on point.

If you want to excel and become more engaging, get this book.  It has already helped me in speech preparations and his structure can be adapted for your own purposes.  You too can become an effective communicator.

Photo Will Marlow via Compfight

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Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze.com® book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”