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I use a reader during the Advent season composed of various Christian authors called Watch for the Light.  On one of the days, I was struck by a passage by J.B. Philips where he writes on our waiting for the second Advent, the Return of Jesus in all his glory,

The New Testament is indeed a book full of hope, but we may search it in vain for any vague humanist optimism.  The second coming of Christ, the second irruption of eternity into time, will be immediate, violent and conclusive.  The human experiment is to end, illusion will give way to reality, the temporary will disappear before the permanent, and the king will be seen for who he is.  The thief in the night, the lightning flash, the sound of the last trumpet, the voice of God’s archangel—these may all be picture language, but they are pictures of something sudden, catastrophic, and decisive.  By no stretch of the imagination do they describe a gradual process.  

I believe that the athiestic-scientifc-humanist point of view is, despite its apparent humanitarianism, both misleading and cruel.  In appearance it may resemble Christianity in that it would encourage tolerance, love, understanding, and the amelioration of human conditions.  But at heart it is cruel, because it teaches that this life is the only life, that we have no place prepared for us in eternity, and that the only realities are those that we can appreciate in our present temporary habitations…