Poesia

Think about your favorite story.

Great stories hardly are about trivial matters, often they are about something much deeper: vanquishing evil, finding love, choosing forgiveness, or celebrating life.  There are things worth fighting for and there are things worth dying for.

In the story that started before the words “In the beginning” was even placed on a parchment, there was love.  And out of this love, the Trinitarian dance, a grand story began.  Forged from the fires of supernovas, slowly the universe took shape and life would take root on this planet.  The Word, as John wrote in his gospel account, brought forth creation long ago.  But somewhere things went wrong, as Adam and Eve brought sin and death into this story.  Humanity needed a way back from the path of death to the way of life.

Athanasius  would capture this way of life, pointing his readers to the Word who became flesh.  He pointedly wrote,

it was our sorry case that caused the Word to come down, our transgression that called out His love for us, so that He made haste to help us and to appear among us. It is we who were the cause of His taking human form, and for our salvation that in His great love He was both born and manifested in a human body. For God had made man thus (that is, as an embodied spirit), and had willed that he should remain in incorruption. But men, having turned from the contemplation of God to evil of their own devising, had come inevitably under the law of death. Instead of remaining in the state in which God had created them, they were in process of becoming corrupted entirely, and death had them completely under its dominion. [1]

While humanity was broken “in sin and error pinning,” the Word became flesh and chose to seek after the lost.

At the core of Advent lies the message of hope: those who were lost can now be found.  Through the first Advent of Jesus, we are saved, “for with his blood mankind he hath bought,” and in his Second Advent, he will put the world to rights.

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[1] St. Athanasius (2009-08-19). On the Incarnation (Kindle Locations 74-79). Unknown. Kindle Edition.

Photo: Giulio Bernardi via Compfight