The early 20th Century had a lot of controversy.  The Evolutionary Theory seemed to knock people off guard and the reliability of Scripture was called into question.  Controversies, however, are nothing new.

Christianity has always had to confront challenges.  Whether it was from the early days of the Church, where Roman scholars vociferously argued against Christianity, or in the era of the Scope Monkey Trial, Biblical scholarship has had to answer big questions.  In the case of this current post, emergence of conflicting gospel accounts seem to make the Four Gospels merely four opinions selected out of dozens of other narratives of Jesus.  Isn’t it possible that Dan Brown is right and that Christianity squelched the truth of the gospels of Thomas or Judas?Illuminated Manuscript

In short, no.

The other gospels like Thomas and Judas were written much later than the Four Gospels found in the New Testament (and many of the key texts used to showcase the positive aspect of Judas were hastily made with bad translations).  According to the earliest dated documents written concerning Jesus of Nazareth, the Apostle Paul seemed to have a very high view of Jesus.  The Four Gospels found in the New Testament were more than likely written in the First Century and captured the early Church’s perspective on Jesus.

Quite frankly, those who might hold up contradictory new gospels like Thomas or Judas do so because they don’t like what the New Testament figure has to say about a variety of things.  A Jesus of nice moral platitudes that our Founding American Fathers liked so much is easier to follow than a messianic figure who equated himself with God.  As the earliest NT writer would say two decades after the crucifixion, the gospel is for our justification and promises restoration of the world one day.  Having a fortune cookie version of Jesus is much safer than the Jesus found in the New Testament.

So What?!

There will be a time where a follower of Christ will be confronted with questions about the Bible.  Defending the reliability of Scripture can be important in certain contexts.  However, sometimes defending the faith can be used in an abusive manner (see The Good, Bad, And The Ugly Of Apologetics), which is not good (just in case you didn’t know).  Apologetics should never be used as a hammer.  But for those occasions when an individual has a legitimate question, we truly do need to be able to give a reason for the hope that lies within us.  We need to be able to answer legitimate questions.

Where fundamentalism gets it wrong is that they defend the faith at all times without smiling.  Have you ever noticed that?  Those people on the street corners holding those big signs, the ones that stand there shouting at you entering into a baseball game or walking down the pier.  I agree that this is serious stuff, but to stand there angry is not good.  Defending the Bible as God’s Word is a good thing, but using it as a hammer at all times is not always the best thing.  Sometimes it needs to be a precise scalpel, a warm cloth, or a piercing sword.