Prayer

Today is Fat Tuesday, the day where you and I can get so much sin out of our lives that we can rightly prepare for Ash Wednesday and 40 days of preparation for Easter.  While not getting into the questions surrounding why an individual should go overboard before a time of repentance, Mardi Gras/Fat Tuesday/Shrove Tuesday was originally begun to get in the last bit of rich food and celebration before the more somber time of fasting arrives on Ash Wednesday.

Now it seems like a lot of Protestant churches are now taking part in Ash Wednesday and remembering the Church Calendar period of Lent.  Why, when I was a kid, Lent was just for Roman Catholics, not for Protestants of many different stripes.  But after my time in Church History classes in my undergrad education at Vanguard University and my time at Fuller Seminary, I have come to the conclusion that it is a helpful practice for the Church as a whole.

There will be people who take part in the time with little thought, that will always happen, but the focus on sin, repentance, and the cross will make the victorious resurrection and vindication of Jesus that much sweeter on Easter.

I do recommend Christians (evangelical, or otherwise) to take part in this ancient practice.  I have written in support of this here and also gave a history of it here.

If you feel called to give up something for 40 days, then that is great.  But please, don’t go flaunting it around everywhere like a martyr.  Fasting from something is meant to be between the individual and God, not a regular Facebook post about the desire to eat chocolate or drink coffee again.  As Jesus said in Matthew 6:16-18,

“And when you fast, do not look gloomy like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces that their fasting may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, that your fasting may not be seen by others but by your Father who is in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you.”

Whether you do or do not begin the fast in the Lenten season, I hope you would at least commit to remembering God’s mercy through his action in Jesus.  As I have said in a previous post years ago, “we should participate in Lent not out of superstition or thoughtless ritual.  Lent ought to be a time of contemplative thought upon Christ and His salvific mercy.”  While Christmas reminds us that God came to us, Lent and Good Friday will remind us that God brought us back into the fold at great cost by bearing our sin.

Am I ever thankful for that!

Are you observing Lent this year?

(This post was originally seen in 2013)

Photo: Lawrence OP via Compfight