Winter morning

Last week, I wrote about the importance of finding hope in a story.  The story that I referred to started even before the foundation of the universe was in place, before any cataclysmic Big Bang.  This story simply started with the Word.  As John told us, the Word was with God and the Word was God.

However, the story took a turn for the worse when humanity decided to walk into sin and chose death over life.  Yet while humanity was broken “in sin and error pinning,” God chose to rescue us and provide a path for restoration.  He provided a means for humanity to be put to right order and eventually for all of creation to be restored (see Romans 8).

Humanity needed a champion, one who could loosen our chains and raise us from the depth of our sins.  The Fourth Century bishop and defender of the faith Athanasius would write,

What—or rather Who was it that was needed for such grace and such recall as we required? Who, save the Word of God Himself, Who also in the beginning had made all things out of nothing? His part it was, and His alone, both to bring again the corruptible to incorruption and to maintain for the Father His consistency of character with all. For He alone, being Word of the Father and above all, was in consequence both able to recreate all, and worthy to suffer on behalf of all and to be an ambassador for all with the Father. [1]

Jesus, the Word who took on flesh (the Incarnation), chose to restore our brokenness.  To borrow from an analogy I used a few weeks ago, we broke a lamp and he not only chose to forgive us, but he also paid for the lamp that we broke.  Athanasius would further this point when he wrote,

For this purpose, then, the incorporeal and incorruptible and immaterial Word of God entered our world. In one sense, indeed, He was not far from it before, for no part of creation had ever been without Him Who, while ever abiding in union with the Father, yet fills all things that are. But now He entered the world in a new way, stooping to our level in His love and Self-revealing to us. [2]

The hope of this story is seen in how God chose to rescue his creation.  He chose to restore the broken and mend their wounds.  The Word, the one who created it all, chose to have the final word by redeeming us. He not only created it all but he also caused the renewal of all. He stooped to our level in his love and revealed himself us.  And like a great epic, at the perfect time, Jesus came and fought for us.

Photo: blmiers2 via Compfight

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[1] St. Athanasius (2009-08-19). On the Incarnation (Kindle Locations 145-148). Kindle Edition.

[2] St. Athanasius (2009-08-19). On the Incarnation (Kindle Locations 142-145). Kindle Edition.